Author Topic: Names of knots from place to place.  (Read 4074 times)

KnotNow!

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Names of knots from place to place.
« on: November 16, 2004, 02:30:41 AM »
Hi, The subject of knot boxes seems to have veered off into a discussion of names and the differences from place to place.  I would like to run this thread for a bit and see what names we can swap.  It helps to keep it confusing here in the Pacific North West because the loggers don't go out of the region, so the names stay the same (and often pretty odd... how can Prusik equal Monkey's Fist.... but up here it does).  I would think sea folk mix with other sea folk, so baring language difference it might be more consistant than landlubbers.  I see the arborists have created a language of thier own, but of course 10 years ago there would have been no internet to link them. ???
ROY S. CHAPMAN, IGKT-PAB BOARD.

Fairlead

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Re: Names of knots from place to place.
« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2004, 02:48:05 AM »
OK Roy - Your a Brave Man....
And before we go any further, my personal view on knot names is "None of them are wrong - just different"
So here is one to start the ball rolling - The Rolling Hitch aka - Riggers Hitch, Magnus Hitch, Taut-Line Hitch.  Yes there are slight differences (depending on which book you read) but I would be interested to learn what your loggers call any one of these variations.  There is one school of thought that the Magnus Hitch variant was derived from a knot the farmers used.  
READERS:  Please do not get into any arguements about the differences - I already know them - all I am interested in is what Roy's local loggers might call any one of these variants.
Gordon

KnotNow!

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Re: Names of knots from place to place.
« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2004, 09:49:18 PM »
Dear Gordon,  I'll start asking around.  I have concentrated on the wire rope work and the rigging used but off the top I'd say the only fiber line I see used is very limited.  Every feller (the guy with a saw who knocks the trees down) and bucker (the fellow who follows the feller and makes the trees into measured lengths... often the same man) carries two one gallon plastic jugs as well as his saw, wedges and pole axe.  One jug has lubricating oil for the saw bar/chain.  The other has gasoline/oil mix for the twocycle engine on his saw.  These he ties together with a loop of 1/4" nylon "clothes line" so they can be slung over his shoulder.  The loop is bent on with any "knife knot" as I don't think one in 50 can tie a good bend and most have found out that the reef knot isn't a bend for this task.  I see many ABOK #1410 used.  All carry a small backback (daypack) with rain gear, food, water or coffee (if he doesn 't mind the weight of the vaccuum bottle) gloves, socks, some limited personal choice mostly a pocket knife and a little flash light (torch to you?).  Nobody wears a pants belt but most carry some more 1/4" line, which might make a belt over the rain gear on a really horrible day.  You can spot a man in the woods by the cloud of steam rising off him so it has to be really bad weather before he gives up the ventilation of beltless pants.   He ties his belt with a slipped granny or a slipped reef knot.  He has no name for either.  There is very little cordage involved.  If something needs to be tied out of the way or secured to the rig almost all know some variation of a Trucker's Hitch, but I don't think they refer to it by any name.  I'll make a real point of asking over the next few weeks and will post back when I have some answers.  These are rough and tumble men, not a single pocket knife has a point on it.  All tools and gear is "expendable".  They work horribly hard, leaving home in full darkness to be on the job (often several hours from home) before first light.  They work until it is too dark to do so safely and hump out of the bush by feel.  But when we get to the wire work almost everyone can do all that is required and very nicely at that.   These guys get hurt pretty often and while healing get to work the softer jobs that don't require instant mobility.  Soft jobs include splicing wire.  What a life!
ROY S. CHAPMAN, IGKT-PAB BOARD.

KnotNow!

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Re: Names of knots from place to place.
« Reply #3 on: November 19, 2004, 05:37:47 AM »
I sat down with one of the neighbors to talk about the knots.  I had forgotten that all these folks fish for salmon.  They know all the common angling knots.  They take the same knots to the woods.  The names get rubbed off in the process.  As often as not the name applied is the name of the person who showed my friend how to tie it.  Why that's a "Johnson Hitch".  If I can actually find some consistancy in the naming I'll post a list.  The  knots are pretty universal, but it is really fun to see some fishing line knots used in unique ways.
ROY S. CHAPMAN, IGKT-PAB BOARD.

Willeke

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Re: Names of knots from place to place.
« Reply #4 on: December 09, 2005, 09:18:08 PM »
Roy,
Have you talked more often with these people?

Willeke
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