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renaming turks heads

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KnotMe:
reposted from Google Plus

Because the name "Turk's Head" has always bothered me (if they wanted to be respectful, they probably would have gone with "turban" or something that didn't involve "head") I've been wanting to see if the Chinese naming offers anything less fraught.  To get that, we need more consensus though, unless I'm just looking in the wrong place.

Starting with the usual authority, Lydia Chen, in Chinese Knotting 3, she presents a 5B4L TH and a 6B5L TH, but considers them variants on the double coin knot and so names them: 奇數圓複雙錢結 (even,  round, complex, double coin knot) and 偶數圓複雙錢結 (odd, round, complex, double coin knot)... I dunno but ocean plait and prolong knots are double coin variants but definitely not TH, so this just muddies the waters.

Trying a few other TH instructions I've found, there's 笼目结 (which translates as "cage head knot" which is an obvious translation from turk's head.  There's also "花股结" which is "flower strand/ply/stream knot" as well as "花箍結" which is "flower hoop/band knot" both of which sound like they're trying to address the flower-like appearance of the flat mat tightening as well as the hoop/band appearance of the cylinder tightening.  I'd almost want to add in the ball/sphere to the works to get huā gū qi? ji?.  8-)  Still that does not cover things like the cruciform TH or ...  Of course, TH doesn't really handle those cases as such either...  Flower-hoop knot?  Flower-stream knot?

French?  Spanish?  Etc?  Are they just translating "Turk's Head"?

Coming back to English and the definition of a TH there's cylindrical/tubular braid or woven ring.  It's too bad "manifold" does not more closely match the specifics of the situation, because I love the word.   ;D  Ah, but diving down the math side of things... how about "Brunnian knots" ?  Look at the pictures, it's so close!   :D  Yah, I know, that would just add tons of confusion and noise to math concept searches... but that'd be good for them, and you too.  8-)

roo:

--- Quote from: KnotMe on September 10, 2014, 07:40:05 PM ---Because the name "Turk's Head" has always bothered me...

--- End quote ---
Why does it bother you?

Wed:
In Swedish, it is "valknop".

The etymology is a bit ambiguous. The obvious and most straight forward translation would be whale knot.

"Valhaent" means fumble fingered or stiff dexterity. Relation to the knot? Who knows. But Hjalmar Oehrwall, in his book gives quite a few theories. I'm not going to write them here.

Paertkunta (Sw) is a round braid fastened on a rope. In this case the one hanging below a yard arm for sailors to stand on to reef the sails. Kuntorna is there so as to keep the feet from slipping. Basically: "Knuta" or "knut" = Knot. "Kunta" = big lump or actually the same as a Turks head knot (No relation at all to the same sounding English term).

That same book has two English quotations:
The Seamen?s Dictionary by sir Henry Manwayring, London A. D. 1670, 

--- Quote ---There are two sorts of Knots, which are used at Sea, the one is a Bowline-knot ? ? The other is a waleknot, which is a round knot or knob, made with three strands of a rope, so that it cannot slip. The tacks, topfall-sheats and stoppers have these waleknots, and many other ropes.
--- End quote ---

The Seamen?s Grammar, written by Captain John Smith, sometimes Governor of Virginia and Admiral of New-England, Printed at London 1652:

--- Quote ---The Wallknot, which is a round knob, so made with the strands or layes of a rope, [that] it cannot slip; the sheats and stoppers use this knot.
--- End quote ---

Conflict between the two definitions? What is now called in English, a wall knot seems to be what in Swedish is called "taljerepsknop" (inverted crown).

If politically correctness is a big issue, I suspect there are no shortage of cans of worms to open. Already before, attempts have been made to clean up the messy mass of terms used in this knotting business. The issue branches exponentially when you bring in the internationality of it all ...

For example: The Lapp knot is related to the scandinavian people up north. Once a perfectly good name. Now not politically correct at all. An English analogy would be using the "N-word" about African Americans. Should we thus rename the knot as the "Same knot"? Pronounced approximately like "Saah meh".

edit: sod the international support of this forum ...

KnotMe:
Can you think of a scenario where the origin of that name is not a slur?


--- Quote from: roo on September 10, 2014, 08:13:00 PM ---
--- Quote from: KnotMe on September 10, 2014, 07:40:05 PM ---Because the name "Turk's Head" has always bothered me...

--- End quote ---
Why does it bother you?

--- End quote ---

KnotMe:

--- Quote from: Wed on September 10, 2014, 10:40:26 PM ---In Swedish, it is "valknop".

--- End quote ---
cool.


--- Quote ---If politically correctness is a big issue, I suspect there are no shortage of cans of worms to open. Already before, attempts have been made to clean up the messy mass of terms used in this knotting business. The issue branches exponentially when you bring in the internationality of it all ...

--- End quote ---
That's true, the whole 卍字結 (sauvastika)/Buddha/10000 knot thing is an East-West interaction issue that is not a problem in isolation.

Still, for such a large category/family of knots, it'd be nice to find a less troublesome name (Although if it's just me, nevermind and carry on.  :D ).


--- Quote ---edit: sod the international support of this forum ...

--- End quote ---
?

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